HEALTH CARE

news Increased miscarriage rates associated with employment status

A South Korean study of about 1.8 million women found that the risk of miscarriage and stillbirth was higher for unemployed women, and the risk of not having children was higher for working women.

Women in the social worker industry had the highest risk of not having children.In addition, manufacturing jobs and health/social work were associated with an increased risk of early miscarriage compared to finance/insurance jobs. . Occupations in manufacturing, wholesale/retail, education/health/social work, and public/social/human resources services consistently showed higher birth risks.

“The good news is that South Korea’s Ministry of Employment and Labor is now amending the Workmen’s Accident Compensation Insurance Act to cover all abortion consequences for pregnant female workers,” he said in a statement. Our study demonstrated the impact of the occupational environment on adverse pregnancy outcomes and contributed to the revision of this legislation.”

This retrospective cohort study Journal of Occupational Health.

Data were obtained from the National Health Information Service (NHIS) of South Korea, the national health insurance system covering approximately 97% of the South Korean population. The study included information from approximately 1.8 million pregnant women aged 20 to her 49 from 2010 to her 2019. About 1.2 million of these women were employed and the rest of her 600,000 were unemployed.

The researchers calculated the risk of three types of miscarriage: early miscarriage (miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy, molar pregnancy), stillbirth, and no live birth (pregnancy without documented subsequent births, including early miscarriage and stillbirth). Did.

Employed pregnant women are more likely to be younger, have lower incomes, and have a normal body mass index (BMI) compared with unemployed pregnant women. and a higher prevalence of smoking history.

Overall, from 2010 to 2019, 18%, 0.7%, and 39.8% of pregnancies ended without early miscarriage, stillbirth, and live birth, respectively. Abortion and stillbirth risks were higher among unemployed women, whereas fertility rates were not higher among employed women. Women in the social worker industry were most at risk of not having children. was associated with an increased risk of early miscarriage compared to work. Occupations in manufacturing, wholesale/retail, education/health/social work, and public/social/human resources services consistently showed higher birth risks.

The authors suggested that these associations could be influenced by working conditions present in many of these occupations, such as manual labor in retail, irregular work schedules for health care workers, and hazardous materials in manufacturing. pointed out that there is a

The researchers acknowledged that the study had limitations and that its results should be interpreted with caution. First, misclassification of unemployment types may have led to bias. Second, better access to obstetric care may have influenced outcomes by allowing better detection of early pregnancy loss, so the diagnostic code of pregnancy is particularly important in health and social work. It may have been invalid.

Despite these limitations, the researchers believe their study allowed them to identify several employment types that may be at higher risk of pregnancy loss.

“Our findings highlight the urgent need to assess working conditions in order to prevent adverse pregnancy outcomes for female workers. It is necessary to identify specific causes of associated adverse pregnancy effects,” the authors concluded.

reference

Kim CB, Choi SA, Kim T, et al. Risk of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes by Mother’s Occupational Status: A National Population-Based Study in South Korea. J Occup Health. Published online January 25, 2023. doi:10.1002/1348-9585.12380

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