HEALTH CARE

The Balance of Power in Congress and its Impact on the 118th Congress | Faegre Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP

Republicans are lining up to regain control of the House by a narrower-than-expected margin. We need 218 votes to do so. Additional races are expected to be called in the next hours and days, and we should formally know control of the House later this week. As we have seen, the narrowness of the majority (in both cases) is remarkable. Republicans, whose vote share was far below some expectations, have won or contested seats in areas where Democrats have struggled in recent years, such as suburbs of New York. With the expected narrow Republican majority, one question is how these gains translate into a right-shifted caucus.

Democrats were able to reverse in the Senate pennsylvania John Fetterman defeated Dr. Mehmet Oz.Republicans dominate elsewhere Nevada, with incumbent Catherine Cortez Mast chasing challenger Adam Laxalt in the most likely pickup.Other vulnerable Democrats included Mark Kelly Arizona and Raphael Warnock GeorgiaDemocrats currently lead in both of these races. However, Warnock has not reached his 50% threshold, with a runoff vote scheduled for Dec. 6. Wisconsin won re-election.of Alaskathe winner will be a Republican, though it’s not clear if it will be incumbent Senator Lisa Markowski or former Trump-backed challenger Kelly Tzibaka.

Legislation in the next 118, given the expected composition of a slightly Republican-dominated House and a roughly evenly split Senateth Congress will no doubt demand some level of bipartisanship. A budget adjustment channel that allows bills to pass the Senate by simple majority vote would not be an option in a divided government. Several pressures for the next Congress, including continued funding of the federal government, eventual increases in the federal debt ceiling, reapproval of the Farm Bill, and geopolitical tensions plus annual defense approvals I have a point. and concerns about national debt and eligibility programs. Additionally, House Republicans had a narrower-than-expected majority, which may cause them to reconsider where they focus their efforts in the new year, especially when it comes to oversight, investigations, and other political activities. Complicating the long-term legislative outlook is the 2024 presidential election, which is already somewhat advanced and will dominate the attention and energy by mid-2023. The Senate will allow President Biden’s nominations (judicial and other) to do so through confirmation.

118th parliament takes oath January 3rd, at which point formal leadership elections will take place. House Majority Leader McCarthy (R-California) is expected to be the next Speaker if the Republicans take control of the House. McCarthy recently showed that Republicans will focus on inflation, border security, and crime, in addition to fulfilling their oversight duties. Although Eric Schmidt has publicly indicated that he does not support keeping Mitch McConnell as Republican leader, leadership is expected to remain the same.

Healthcare related committees

Retirement guarantees replacement of leadership for some senior committees related to medical issues.

  • Senate budget — Chairman Leahy (Democrat-VT) and ranking member Shelby (Republican-AL) are stepping down at the end of the term. He will be replaced by Senator Murray (D-Washington) and Senator Collins (Republican-Main).
  • Senate Committee on Health, Education, Work and Pensions (HELP) — Senator Sanders (I-VT) is expected to lead HELP for Democrats, as Speaker Murray (D-WA) is expected to lead the Appropriations Committee. Ranking member Bar (R-NC) retires. Expected to be replaced by Senator Paul (Republican-Kentucky) unless he takes another office.
  • household means — Ranking member Brady (Republican-Texas) retires. Candidates for the office include Rep. Jason Smith (R-Missouri), Rep. Buchanan (R-Florida) and Rep. Adrian Smith (R-Nebraska). Rep. Neal (D-Massachusetts) will remain on as Democratic chairman.

Other committees change leadership only in the event of an unexpected election loss.

  • Senate finance — Senators Crapo (R-ID) and Senators Wyden (D-OR) are expected to continue to lead.
  • house energy and commerce — Expected to continue to be led by Rep. McMorris Rogers (R-Washington) and Rep. Pallone (D-NJ).
  • home assignment — Rep. Granger (R-Texas) and Rep. De Lauro (D-Connecticut) are expected to continue to lead.

Final committee ratios will not be determined until all races have been convened and an organizing meeting has taken place. In addition to committee ratios, the House could see changes in the number and size of committees. House Republicans said they wanted a “committee on China” and that the Democrats’ “committee on the climate crisis” could be scrapped.

Financial Services Committee

  • household means — Ranking member Brady (Republican-Texas) retires. Candidates for the office include Rep. Jason Smith (R-Missouri), Rep. Buchanan (R-Florida) and Rep. Adrian Smith (R-Nebraska). Rep. Neal (D-Massachusetts) will remain on as Democratic chairman.
  • house financial services — Will be led by Chairman Patrick McHenry (Republican-North Carolina) and ranking member Maxine Waters (Democrat-California).
  • Senate finance — Senators Crapo (R-ID) and Senators Wyden (D-OR) are expected to continue to lead.
  • Senate Bank It will be led by Sen. Sherrod Brown (Democrat-Ohio) and Tim Scott (Republican-South Carolina).

Final committee ratios will not be determined until all races have been convened and an organizing meeting has taken place. In addition to committee ratios, the House could see changes in the number and size of committees. House Republicans said they wanted a “committee on China” and that the Democrats’ “committee on the climate crisis” could be scrapped.

118 health policiesth meeting

Healthcare looms large after key topics in many election cycles, especially the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the Republican-led “Repeal and Replace” effort, followed by the response to the COVID-19 pandemic The agenda of the new parliament. Key topics include the expected transition from the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency (PHE) and continued access to care via telemedicine within public programs and the scaling back or transition of some emergency policies. A set of policy implications. Another topic to be promoted is legislation codifying abortion rights, but the Republican-dominated House of Representatives is highly unlikely to take action on such a bill. topics — including the reauthorization of royalties, reform of the nation’s pandemic response system, and perhaps unaddressed FDA policies unmotivated by policies to address the nation’s mental health crisis — have been addressed, 118 may be removed.th agenda. Beyond these big-ticket items, Congress could put many health care bills on its agenda, including extensions and reauthorizations of Medicare, Medicaid, and other programs.

118 Focus areas for financial services over the periodth meeting

monitoring – Assuming the Republican Party retakes the House, ranking member McHenry (R-North Carolina) would focus his position on oversight of the House Financial Services Committee, rather than letting the executive branch pursue a social agenda. It will likely allow you to focus on inflation and other economic issues.

NFIP extension – Long-term reauthorization of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) has eluded Congress for years, but McHenry will likely make another attempt after reaching a deal with Waters at 117.th meeting.

2017 tax cut extension – In a year when the economy is at the forefront and heading into the presidential election, Republicans will want to promote the tax cut package enacted under Trump. may require bipartisan support.

Farm Bill – Congress must reauthorize the Farm Bill and its underlying programs. Among them is the Federal Crop Insurance Program. The bill is considered a mandatory passage measure.

Privacy Law – Privacy legislation has made great strides in this Congress. US Data Privacy Act Approved by the House Energy and Commerce Committee. The bill has the support of bipartisan leaders on House committees. However, the bill was not considered throughout the House due to concerns about how it might affect California’s own privacy laws. The debate on privacy will continue in the new Congress. But divided governments and jurisdictional issues will continue to complicate the final passage.

retirement security – Bipartisan support for retirement security (SECURE 2.0, EARN IT Act, etc.) is expected to lead to a number of provisions in the Appropriations Agreement this year. If that set of provisions isn’t included, it could end up back in the new Congress.

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